Thanks and Recognition – help make a colleague’s day

It’s been two months since the University launched Thanks and Recognition – a new way for us all to thank colleagues for doing such a great job, supporting us in our time of need or going above and beyond.

In that time, more than 350 personal messages of thanks have been posted on the Thanks and Recognition Wall, and the Wall itself has had over 10,000 views from colleagues across our community.

There are countless examples of situations where we want to thank our colleagues. We created Thanks and Recognition to try and capture some of these and, if the recipient of thanks allows, share and amplify them to colleagues across our University.

The messages I’ve seen have been touching and uplifting, and each one undoubtedly helped to make the recipient’s day. The Wall now hosts hundreds of messages thanking colleagues for everything from their valued support with research and new ideas, to their help delivering inspiring and inclusive learning, their kindness in looking out for the wellbeing of colleagues and students, and their small, everyday acts of kindness that have meant a great deal to colleagues during difficult times.

I am particularly pleased that colleagues from every faculty and division are represented on the Wall – our institution is well known for its collegiality and it has been wonderful to see that spirit on display in this way.

We have received some great feedback on Thanks and Recognition and, for that reason, our fantastic in-house team has been working to further enhance the system and make it even better. We will be launching a new and improved system in the next few weeks – watch this space.

In the meantime, if you haven’t already, I encourage you to take a look at the Thanks and Recognition Wall and read some of heart-warming messages of thanks and recognition it holds. Better still, why not submit your own message of thanks to a colleague or team that really deserves it and help make their day.

The 2019 Student Mental Health and Wellbeing Survey – why it’s important and what we’ve been doing since last year.

Professor Sarah Purdy, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Student Experience)

By Professor Sarah Purdy, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Student Experience).

Young adults today are more likely to experience mental health problems than previous generations and around three in four adults who experience a mental illness will have symptoms before the age of 25[1].

Bristol takes its commitment to these issues very seriously and last year introduced an institution-wide Student Mental Health and Wellbeing Survey in partnership with the Bristol SU. The survey was responded to by over 5,700 students, making it one of the largest pieces of research into student mental health in the UK. It deepened our understanding of the issues affecting Bristol students and gave us valuable insight on how the support we provide is viewed.

The responses to the Survey in 2018 helped shape the University’s new Student Mental Health and  Wellbeing Strategy which outlines the work we’ll be doing to improve support for our students’ mental health and wellbeing. We’ve already began to implement some of the work highlighted in the strategy and hope the responses to this year’s Student Mental Health and Wellbeing survey will tell us if we’re on the right track – and inform us of what we can do better if not.

The survey for 2019 is now open and students can complete it at SMHW 2019.

Offering enough support to students is a must for any University. Keeping the channels open between us and our student community for conversation is essential to ensure that support is not only on offer, but right for them. The annual Student Mental Health and Wellbeing Survey is one such channel that provides our students an opportunity to have a confidential and frank discussion about what we offer and how we can continue to improve.

Last year’s findings have already done a huge amount towards our understanding of what our students are experiencing and their expectations. I hope this year’s findings will be equally insightful.


Here’s what we have done so far since last year’s survey.

Student wellbeing

Bristol students reported issues with their wellbeing, and one in four students said they didn’t have someone to talk to about their day-to-day problems.

Our Residential Life and Student Wellbeing Services are now providing 24/7 support for student wellbeing in residences and schools; helping students to manage their wellbeing proactively and ensuring there’s always someone to speak to for additional information, advice and support. We’ve also worked with Bristol SU to deliver the Bristol SU Living Room in Senate House; a space to relax, unwind and connect with other students whilst on campus.

Mental health

More than one in three Bristol students have experienced a diagnosed mental health problem at some point in their lives, and 80% of students with a mental health problem have seen a doctor since beginning University.

Additional University funding enables our Students’ Health Service to provide extended same day GP mental health appointments, and specialist support for students who have complex mental health conditions that require longer term psychological intervention. We’ve also increased the funding of our Mental Health Advice Team who support students with enduring mental health conditions to manage their healthcare needs alongside their studies.

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